Earlier this year, I wrote a blog about a new workplace benefit – student loan debt relief.  Now, it seems employers are again thinking outside the box with respect to employee benefits.  The latest workplace benefits employers are offering include onsite meditation, yoga and other programs that help workers de-stress.  Other unique benefits are

Line of people taking notesEarlier this year the Court of Appeals overturned the district court’s dismissal of a case regarding the negligent retention of an employee.  In Hartfiel v. Allison, unpublished Court File # A15-1149 (Minn. Ct. App. 2016) Mr. Hartfiel, the plaintiff, drove truck for T.J. Potter Trucking Inc. as an independent owner-operator.  Mr. Allison drove truck for

In Minnesota the long-standing rule is that continuation of employment by itself, is insufficient consideration for a non-compete agreement entered into after employment has commenced.  Minnesota employers have always been able to require new employees to enter into non-compete agreements in exchange for starting a job.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled the continuation of at-will

A coalition of Minnesota DFL legislators is proposing a bill that would ensure all employees in Minnesota have paid family and sick leave.  The DFL proposal would establish a state insurance program which would offer employees in Minnesota up to 80% of their pay for up to 12 weeks a year for pregnancy or medical

At-will employment is believed by many employers to allow them the ability to terminate an employee for any reason or no-reason at all, except for a discriminatory reason. We advise our clients to make “at-will” employment status very clear in job offers and in employee handbooks. This prevents an “at-will” employee from believing a contract

Many employers mistakenly think if they don’t have a written contract with employees or their employees don’t have a union, then the employees are “at-will.” “At-will” employment may be terminated by an employer or an employee at any time for basically any reason.  In Minnesota, employees are presumed to be employed “at-will.”

It is possible