A few years back my oldest son Zach became extremely sick. For weeks he was tired and could barely struggle through a full day of school. All he wanted to do was sleep. After several doctor visits, nothing was clear except we ruled out mono, strep, and the flu.

Then a strange cough developed and again we ran to the doctor. This time the doctor thought he might have whooping cough, and immediately began antibiotic treatment even before the diagnosis was confirmed. Two days later on a Friday evening, the doctor called and confirmed Zach tested positive for whooping cough, and advised me the whole family would have to be quarantined. I was in shock. How could he get whooping cough? He was up to date on all his immunizations and booster shots.

The doctor then asked me how Zach was doing and to be honest, I had let him go to a play with his friends because for the first time in weeks he was actually feeling pretty good. The doctor advised me I would have to go pick him up as his next phone call would be to the County Health Department to report a case of whooping cough, and put our family in quarantine. I had to make arrangements for prophylactic prescription antibiotics for each family member, and notify everyone Zach had been in contact with during the week that he had whooping cough. We all took our antibiotics, watched a lot of movies, and stayed at home for the prescribed period.

What in the world was NBC medical correspondent Dr. Nancy Snyderman thinking, when she recently broke quarantine imposed due to her exposure to ebola?  She had traveled to Liberia to cover the spread of ebola for the evening news.  I had watched her report and wondered whether it was a good idea to send a news crew to cover the story. Within a very short time, news coverage reported one of her camera crew had contracted Ebola and was being treated in Nebraska. Just yesterday, news coverage reported Dr. Snyderman had broken her 21 day quarantine when she went to get take-out food with her camera crew at a New Jersey restaurant.

Irresponsible is the first word that comes to my mind. NBC, as her employer, I hope you are paying attention. As an on-air medical professional, she exercised extremely poor judgment which goes to the very question of her credibility to continue to report medical news. She should have honored the quarantine, reported stories via Skype about being quarantined, and maybe even done a few historical pieces on past quarantines. She would have been entitled to exercise FMLA leave, and could have educated the public about the laws surrounding quarantine. Instead, I predict she may lose her job as a medical correspondent for NBC.